Monthly Archives: September 2014

Root Beer Review #18 – Henry Weinhard’s Root Beer

Root Beer!  Henry Weinhard!  Scrumptious! From the Pacific Northwest!

 HenryWeinhard

Wikipedia reports that in 1887, Henry Weinhard offered to pump free beer into the Skidmore Fountain for its dedication; the city declined the offer due to the fear of rowdy horses.[2]  Rowdy Horses! Continue reading

Weekend Recap: September 26-28

Derek’s Hiking Journal: Mt. Jefferson

At the peak of Jefferson, I met a carefree hiker. He had hiking poles, some short shorts, and obviously was enjoying his time in the mountains. I had my map out trying to determine which of the two peaks was the real peak, and he offered some help with directions. I told him I was just on my way down the Cap Ridge Trail. He said he had crested Mt. Adams, and may return if it clears up. He said he parked at Appalachia, and I tried making some hiking small talk.

“How far is that?”

“I don’t know”

“Ok. How long did it take you?”

“I don’t know. I think it’s about noon right now, and I don’t know when I left, maybe around 8:30?”

I learned he obviously didn’t have a care in the world and it didn’t matter how far he was going to hike, or where he was going.  As he turned away to continue on his hike in the direction of Mt. Washington, I heard “It’s a good day to be alive.” And indeed it was.

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Week of September 22nd – Best of Liver Lovers Unite

First things first, here are the answers to the quiz! How did you do?

1. What is the only known therapy for treatment of PSC?
A liver transplant.
2. What is the technical term for yellowing of the eyes or skin?
Jaundice
3. When was Derek and Logan’s surgery date?
April 14th.
4. Name at least two tests from the Liver Function Profile, i.e. blood results that have to do with proper liver operation
AST, ALK, Alkaline Phosphatase, and we’d even take bilirubin, creatinine, or INR as acceptable answers.
5. What does MELD stand for?
Model for End-stage Liver Disease
6. How many days was Logan in the hospital for?
7 days!
7. What is the largest organ?
The liver is the largest internal organ (and largest gland), but the skin is the largest organ in area and weight.
8. Name two complications associated with PSC.
Jaundice, fatigue, ascites, cholangiocarcinoma, portal hypertension, variceal bleeding, bile duct infections, and osteopenia.
9.  Where and when was the first live liver donation performed in New England?
Lahey Clinic in 1998.
10. What song(s) did Derek play on the piano while in the hospital?
Send in the Clowns, The Entertainer, and The Muppet Show and a little boogie woogie riff.

 

Friday dance boogie

Friday dance boogie

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American Liver Foundation and A Quiz

During the month of September, The American Liver Foundation has been shining the light on PSC. I wish they had a quiz so all our long-time readers could really show off their knowledge.

FocusOn

I borrowed this picture from their website and since they don’t have a quiz I’ll make one up!

The PragmaticHepatic Reader Quiz

1. What is the only known therapy for treatment of PSC?

2. What is the technical term for yellowing of the eyes or skin?

3. When was Derek and Logan’s surgery date?

4. Name at least two tests from the Liver Function Profile, i.e. blood results that have to do with proper liver operation

5. What does MELD stand for?

6. How many days was Logan in the hospital for?

7. What is the largest organ?

8. Name two complications associated with PSC.

9.  Where and when was the first live liver donation performed in New England?

10. What song(s) did Derek play on the piano while in the hospital?

Bonus Question: Have you considered being an organ donor?

 

Answers will be given in tomorrow’s post!

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Doctor Checkup

Logan and I headed down to Lahey Hospital yesterday for my checkup. The hospital was extremely busy. Typically there’s a line before checking in for bloodwork, but once you’re in the waiting room, it’s no time at all. This time, it was almost a 20 minute wait. Longer than pizza delivery! It seems like a rerun, but while we were waiting, I was recognized by one of the phlebotomists who drew my blood when I was in the hospital.

The hepatobiliary waiting room was also packed. Almost no seats available in the waiting room, and the nurses told us they were overbooked on rooms for all the patients. We were put into a room that I never knew existed. A student was shadowing the surgeon during his rounds and had reviewed my file before coming into the secret room. “He reminded me how much you actually went through”, was the surgeon’s introduction. Yes, as time passes, the memories get a little fuzzier, even for me.

We had our normal doctor-patient discussion and when I say normal, it’s normal for us. I wanted to know specific blood results and whether I could drop some medication. He wanted me to go on prednisone, a recurring discussion, and we laughed at him and told him he needed to duke that out with the other doctors. I was made fun of while getting a shot of Neupogen and we had some more laughs. Logan said in another post that going to see the doctors is like a reunion, and it really does feel like that. People kept filing out of their offices because they heard we were in the office and wanted to say hello. Logan and I made our rounds to see some of the other doctors including Logan’s surgeon. I’ve never seen Logan so willing to show someone her scar, but it’s a special relationship she has with her surgeon. They complimented each other on a job well done. At the end of the conversation, he said, “What is that fist bump thing, again?” and they proceeded to perform a special handshake. Who else has convinced their surgeon to have a special handshake?

I love them so much in the hepatobiliary clinic that I’ll be seeing them again next Thursday to check my bloodwork again and get my flu shot.